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Bradman the Musician
 

Don Bradman playing the piano at Columbia Studios in 1930 during a recording session.

 
Don Bradman playing the piano at Columbia Studios in 1930 during a recording session.
Don Bradman grew up in a very musical household. The piano held pride of place in the lounge room (as it did in many Australian homes in the 1920s) and family and neighbourhood sing-a-longs were a common occurrence. Don's sister Lilian, who subsequently became a piano teacher, taught her brother how to play piano and later recorded that he had the ability to learn by ear.

Despite his rising cricket fame, Bradman maintained his interest in playing, recording and even writing music. While he was on the 1930 tour to England he took time out to be recorded in the Columbia Record Studios playing 'Old Fasioned Locket' and 'Our Bungalow of Dreams' as solo piano pieces.

Later that same year, on his return to Australia, D. Davis & Company released a 78rpm record featuring a piece written for piano by Don Bradman called 'Every Day is a Rainbow Day for Me'. At about the same time a best selling single called 'Our Don Bradman', 'a snappy foxt-trot song' by Jack O'Hagan was as huge success across the length and breadth of the country.

When touring with the national and state cricket teams he was often found by his team-mates away from the noise and distraction of the bar, playing piano in an adjacent room. Throughout his life Don Bradman continued to frequently play the piano enjoying it for the relaxation it gave, from the various pressures of his fame.

Don Bradman at Columbia Recording Studios, Sydney after commercially recording his composition 'Every Day is a Rainbow Day for Me', 1930.
Don Bradman at Columbia Recording Studios, Sydney after commercially recording his composition 'Every Day is a Rainbow Day for Me', 1930.

 


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